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hplyrikz:

I can relate to this

hplyrikz:

I can relate to this

(Source: groundedonthedaily, via msleahhbicoftheartroom)

"After some 30 years of [analyzing teaching], I have concluded that classroom teaching—particularly at the elementary and secondary levels—is perhaps the most complex, most challenging, and most demanding, subtle, nuanced, and frightening activity that our species has ever invented. In fact, when I compared the complexity of teaching with that much more highly rewarded profession, “doing medicine,” I concluded that the only time medicine even approaches the complexity of an average day of classroom teaching is in an emergency room during a natural disaster. When 30 patients want your attention at the same time, only then do you approach the complexity of the average classroom on an average day."

The wisdom of practice: essays on teaching, learning and learning to teach Lee S. Shulman (via luckyseventeen)

(via msleahhbicoftheartroom)

*4

things happening

The district I’m placed in this semester has an opening. I love the school, I love the kids, and I would love to start work there because it is just so freaking great.

It’s spring and I feel unnaturally productive so I’m going to try to use this to get stuff done.

I haven’t been as engaged in Tumblr life and the community as I’d like to be. I hope everybody is doing well. I’m a month away from graduation, and I feel it particularly appropriate to thank this community for helping me become a better educator.

"

I’ve never been female. But I have been black my whole life. I can perhaps offer some insight from that perspective. There are many similar social issues related to access to equal opportunity that we find in the black community, as well as the community of women in a white male dominate society…

When I look at — throughout my life — I’ve known that I wanted to do astrophysics since I was 9 years old…I got to see how the world around me reacted to my expressions of these ambitions. All I can say is, the fact that I wanted to be a scientist, an astrophysicist was hands down the path of most resistance through the forces of society.

Anytime I expressed this interest, teachers would say, ‘Oh, don’t you wanna be an athlete?’ I want to become someone that was outside of the paradigm of expectations of the people in power. Fortunately, my depth of interest of the universe was so deep and so fuel enriched that everyone of these curve balls that I was thrown, and fences built in front of me, and hills that I had to climb, I just reach for more fuel, and I just kept going.

Now, here I am, one of the most visible scientists in the land, and I wanna look behind me and say, ‘Where are the others who might have been this,’ and they’re not there! …I happened to survive and others did not simply because of forces of society that prevented it at every turn. At every turn.

…My life experience tells me that when you don’t find blacks, when you don’t find women in the sciences, I know that these forces are real, and I had to survive them in order to get where I am today.

So before we start talking about genetic differences, you gotta come up with a system where there’s equal opportunity, then we can have that conversation.

"

Neil DeGrasse Tyson in response to a question posed by Lawrence Summers, former Treasury Security and Harvard University President

"What’s up with chicks and science?"

Are there genetic differences between men and women, explain why more men are in science.

(via magnius159)

(via ragelikeadog)

"Stonewall was colored folks, poor folks, transsexuals, femmes, butches… a little bit of everybody. But the narrative that gets sold to people is that it was all these ‘A-Gay’ white normative people. That’s not who riots. Sorry."

Juba Kalamka in this interview (via soldadera-del-amor)

"that’s not who riots".

(via genderqueerkid)

THANK YOU.  

(via voguingfemme)

THATS NOT WHO RIOTS!! so perfect

(via doorhingeteeth)

(Source: niaking, via beccaboxes)

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

be-blackstar:

This is how you handle getting your privileged called out. 

Not “reverse racism!” Not “heterophobe!” and all those other dynamics that don’t exist. Just recognition. Recognition of privilege (and hopefully continuous self-checking) 

^ THIS

(Source: lohan, via theroguefeminist)

jamvega:

Junot Díaz & Peter Sagal: Immigrants, Masculinity, Nerds, & Art [x]

We also have a popular culture which acts as a megaphone for the larger American tendencies towards anti-intellectualism.

(via contentmentreborn)